decoarchitecture:

"Light Rails" - Birmingham, Alabamaby Bill Fitzgibbons
We’ve been seeing a lot of great public art like this in Atlanta, both in terms of murals and in terms of installation art using light. Glad it’s happening elsewhere. -Wendy
From a feature on Tulsa Public Radio:

A San Antonio artist has won a prestigious national award. Light, in fact, is the medium of the piece created by Bill FitzGibbons.“I installed in downtown Birmingham, Alabama; a public artwork called Light Rails,” FitzGibbons said. “It was put in an art deco 1930s railroad underpass.”The place was a wide and very dark railroad bridge separating downtown Birmingham from a neat new park and ball field the city built. But as FitzGibbons explained, it was not an inviting place.“[It was] rather dark and had some transients hanging out in it, and there were some safety issues,” he said.Birmingham could have just added lights to the area, but instead they had FitzGibbons add art that was full of light."And the art deco architecture was just perfect for a light installation," he said. "I wanted to respect the architecture, at the same time turn it into a dynamic, energized artwork.”
Zoom Info
decoarchitecture:

"Light Rails" - Birmingham, Alabamaby Bill Fitzgibbons
We’ve been seeing a lot of great public art like this in Atlanta, both in terms of murals and in terms of installation art using light. Glad it’s happening elsewhere. -Wendy
From a feature on Tulsa Public Radio:

A San Antonio artist has won a prestigious national award. Light, in fact, is the medium of the piece created by Bill FitzGibbons.“I installed in downtown Birmingham, Alabama; a public artwork called Light Rails,” FitzGibbons said. “It was put in an art deco 1930s railroad underpass.”The place was a wide and very dark railroad bridge separating downtown Birmingham from a neat new park and ball field the city built. But as FitzGibbons explained, it was not an inviting place.“[It was] rather dark and had some transients hanging out in it, and there were some safety issues,” he said.Birmingham could have just added lights to the area, but instead they had FitzGibbons add art that was full of light."And the art deco architecture was just perfect for a light installation," he said. "I wanted to respect the architecture, at the same time turn it into a dynamic, energized artwork.”
Zoom Info
decoarchitecture:

"Light Rails" - Birmingham, Alabamaby Bill Fitzgibbons
We’ve been seeing a lot of great public art like this in Atlanta, both in terms of murals and in terms of installation art using light. Glad it’s happening elsewhere. -Wendy
From a feature on Tulsa Public Radio:

A San Antonio artist has won a prestigious national award. Light, in fact, is the medium of the piece created by Bill FitzGibbons.“I installed in downtown Birmingham, Alabama; a public artwork called Light Rails,” FitzGibbons said. “It was put in an art deco 1930s railroad underpass.”The place was a wide and very dark railroad bridge separating downtown Birmingham from a neat new park and ball field the city built. But as FitzGibbons explained, it was not an inviting place.“[It was] rather dark and had some transients hanging out in it, and there were some safety issues,” he said.Birmingham could have just added lights to the area, but instead they had FitzGibbons add art that was full of light."And the art deco architecture was just perfect for a light installation," he said. "I wanted to respect the architecture, at the same time turn it into a dynamic, energized artwork.”
Zoom Info

decoarchitecture:

"Light Rails" - Birmingham, Alabama
by Bill Fitzgibbons

We’ve been seeing a lot of great public art like this in Atlanta, both in terms of murals and in terms of installation art using light. Glad it’s happening elsewhere. -Wendy

From a feature on Tulsa Public Radio:

A San Antonio artist has won a prestigious national award. Light, in fact, is the medium of the piece created by Bill FitzGibbons.

“I installed in downtown Birmingham, Alabama; a public artwork called Light Rails,” FitzGibbons said. “It was put in an art deco 1930s railroad underpass.”

The place was a wide and very dark railroad bridge separating downtown Birmingham from a neat new park and ball field the city built. But as FitzGibbons explained, it was not an inviting place.

“[It was] rather dark and had some transients hanging out in it, and there were some safety issues,” he said.

Birmingham could have just added lights to the area, but instead they had FitzGibbons add art that was full of light.

"And the art deco architecture was just perfect for a light installation," he said. "I wanted to respect the architecture, at the same time turn it into a dynamic, energized artwork.”